The Strongest Boy – a book for girls too!!!

When writing The Strongest Boy, I intended the main readers to be boys, but it is definitely a book that can be enjoyed by both genders.  The Strongest Boy explores the notion of redefining masculinity and redefining what it means to be strong by using your mind, words and heart. It is also a great learning tool to help children with physical outbursts and self-regulation.

So why is it an important read for girls too?

52942200_10156517169298525_5553369130062577664_n

Girls really need to know what STRONG boys and men look like.

Our girls are growing up in a world of the #MeToo movement, revenge porn, sexting and a global increase in violence against women.

The following statistics are frightening:

  • On average at least one woman a week is killed by a partner or former partner in Australia.
  • One in three Australian women has experienced physical violence since the age of 15.
  • One in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence.
  • One in four Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner.
  • One in four Australian women has experienced emotional abuse by a current or former partner
  • Eight out of ten women aged 18 to 24 were harassed on the street in the past year
  • One in five teenage girls are pressured into sending nude pics of themselves to boys at school

(Sources: Australian Institute of Criminology, Domestic Violence Prevention Centre, UNWomen, The Big Smoke)

Now more than ever girls need male role models who are strong in every sense of the word. They need to be reading about boys who use their mind, words and heart to be strong.  They need to know what the REAL strong looks like and that there are many, many males out there who fit into this category.

Books that empower boys, empower girls too

By empowering boys to be strong with their mind, words and heart paves the way for a kinder, more compassionate and peaceful world. By empowering boys, we also empower our girls.

Girls can also struggle with physical outbursts and self-regulation

When children are young and are not yet able to fully communicate their ideas or express their emotions, it is quite common for them to lash out and hurt others. Biting, hitting and pulling hair is a quick way for toddlers and young children to get attention and express feelings of anger, loneliness or fear. These experiences are common for both boys and girls and The Strongest Boy is a great book to promote positive behaviours and to help children self-regulate.


More about The Strongest Boy:

“Max believes he is the strongest boy in the world. He can do all sorts of tough tricks, like showing off his strong muscles, jumping off the furniture, pushing people over and even breaking things. His cheeky pet bird, Bruce tells him just how strong he is too. One day, they both go to a birthday party and Max thinks he is the strongest, mightiest, coolest kid there. But why was everyone mad at him?”

The Strongest Boy redefines masculinity in a subtle, yet engaging way for young readers.

Follow Max and Bruce as they learn what it truly means to be a “strong male in today’s world”.


Some industry reviews:

“This delightful picture book explores the notion of how to be a strong boy. Rather than just using physical strength that often hurts others sometimes accidentally, Max learns better ways of being strong using his mind and his words. This is such an important message to share with all young children.” – Maggie Dent, parenting author, educator and resilience specialist

“What does ‘strong’ really mean in a world of faster, bigger, brighter? This book explains to young people in a simple language what ‘the other strong’ means and how it can positively affect people around us. “The Strongest Boy” can be a first step into clean masculinity”. – Gerold Mayr, Mankind Project QLD

“What a beautiful story to help children be the best they can be and make great choices with their friends. Max’s story shows children how small changes can make a huge difference.” – Dr Samantha Hornery, Learning Links Education Manager